Dental Medicine

Dental Medicine

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Category: Uncategorized

Oral Medicine – The Best Dental Medicine Course To Fight Against Oral Diseases

Posted on August 10, 2018 in Uncategorized

Oral Medicine / Dental Medicine

Oral medicine is also known as dental medicine, is a medical specialty focused on the treatment of different kinds of diseases related to the mouth and nearby structures. It acts an interface between medicine and dentistry.

Oral medicine or dental medicine basically deals with clinical examination and non-surgical treatment of non-dental pathologies affecting the area which includes the mouth and the lower face.

In fact, an array of systemic diseases has signs or symptoms that evident in the mouth. Pathologically, the mouth may be affected by many gastrointestinal situations. Indeed, there is also a unique condition of hard tissues penetrating the epithelial continuity. The part that covers teeth then causes unique pathologic entities known as plaque-induced illness.

Another aspect of this medical field is the management of the oral and dental health problems, especially for those patients who are already suffering from other dangerous illness like cancer.

Practical Training in Oral Medicine:

Practical skill training is an integral part of Oral Medicine, which influences knowledge and attitude of dental students towards medical health care of the patients. Theory knowledge is to know something about any subject while a practical knowledge or informal knowledge manifests itself as skills. Practical knowledge is about the implementation of theory knowledge. Practical training plays a special role in the Oral Medicine. If an individual have more practical knowledge, then definitely they will provide better treatment to the patients for their quicker or faster recovery.

An oral medicine specialist is trained in order to examine and manage patients with illness of mouth and lower area. An oral medicine doctor has to receive additional expert training and experience in the diagnosis and management of oral disorders, including, ulcers, infection, allergies, immune-mediated & autoimmune disorders, salivary gland disorders and other.

There are following procedure followed by Oral Medicine doctor for diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases:

Biopsies: Biopsies are nothing, but surgical removal of tissue or bone specimen for analysis in order to obtain an examination.

Ordering and interpretation of tests: These kinds of tests which includes, imaging studies like, salivary & blood tests, CT scans, x-rays, etc.

Medical management: First of all, I would like to tell you that medical management is basically treated with topical and systemic medications to treat a large number of situations.

Specialized injections: It is inserting injection in the mouth or face of patients for the purposes of diagnosis, or sometimes for pain relief, anesthesia and inflammation.

Skilled and Knowledgeable Oral Medicine doctors can easily work at following practice settings:

Private practice: Oral Medicine doctor or dentist in a private practice setting provides the best and specialized care to the patients suffering from different kinds of general oral health problems, including, tooth decay, cavity problems, mouth ulcer, etc. This may be done either in a group or solo practice setting which provides a mix of the practice of dentistry and medicine as well.

Dental and medical schools: Dentist does various activities, like teaching, patient care and research by managing their time smartly. At dental, medical schools, they generally teach oral diagnosis and proper treatment planning, dental management of medically complex patients, and other essential oral medicine topics, like abnormalities, salivary gland disorders, facial pain, etc. In fact, they do really a good job for patient care and medical research.

Hospital / Healthcare facility: Dentist also provides best dental services to all the patients’ suffering from dental diseases in the hospital. They put their full efforts for the patients’ best and quicker recovery.

Research / Scientific Studies: Dentist involves them in research studies. In fact, they write and publish articles in the literature and textbooks on distinct subject areas of dental hygiene and the dental management of complex medical situation. They may conduct clinical research studies too, while treating patients in the research laboratories.

Top medical universities for continuing dental education or oral medical education:

An individual can find unlimited dental, medical universities or oral medicine universities all over the world in order to pursue oral or dental medicine course for exploring the theoretical as well as practical knowledge. Now, no one raises this question that where to study medicine abroad any more. In fact, this is a branch of medicine which provides evergreen career opportunities at various above mentioned practice settings including, private practice, dental and medical schools, hospital / health facility, research / scientific studies, etc. In fact, one can fulfill their basic and advanced needs as well easily by earning better with this specialty.

Atlanta Dental Schools

Posted on August 9, 2018 in Uncategorized

Atlanta, the state capital and largest city in Georgia, has several accredited dental schools. They aim to educate dental students in order to improve the overall health of the society. Georgia Medical Institute, DDS Emory University, Bauder College, Westwood College, Sanford-Brown Institute, and Penn Foster Career School are among the best dental institutes in Atlanta; they all offer quality dental education programs. Atlanta dental schools’ education programs provide you with a wide range of career options in dentistry.

Candidates with a B.S. or B.A. degree are eligible to apply for dental courses. In order to apply, you have to take the Dental Admissions Test. Even though many graduates take the test, only the best students can get through this admission test. Through Atlanta dental schools, one can attain either a D.D.S. (Doctor of Dental Surgery) or D.M.D (Doctor of Dental Medicine) degree. The students are required to take National Board’s part I and II examinations. Only those who pass these examinations are awarded with the D.D.S or D.M.D degree. Also, potential dentists need to pass exams conducted by state dental boards. After passing the examination, you can apply for a state license.

The majority of Atlanta dental schools offer dental assistant programs as well. Dental assistants are trained to perform chair-side assisting methods, patient care, and laboratory and office duties. They normally work under the guidance of a licensed dentist. Dental assistants are given training in using laboratory equipment such as amalgamators, dental units and chairs, model trimmers, oral evacuation equipment, and more.

Most Atlanta dental schools offer an autonomous curriculum, designed exclusively to meet all the academic needs of students. Atlanta dental schools run clinics of their own to provide practice-oriented training.

Sugar and Dental Decline

Posted on August 8, 2018 in Uncategorized

I graduated from dental school having been told that due to advances in preventive care most of my career would be spent replacing failed fillings, doing routine maintenance and cosmetic work as the need to treat dental decay or perform root canal treatments and extractions would be greatly reduced. However, 20 years later I find that I am performing more extractions than ever before, doing more and more root canal procedures and dealing with rampant dental decay and gum disease in all ages. Anecdotally I feel that dental disease is actually on the increase and appears to be more widespread, severe and aggressive. Dental decay rates in children has increased progressively since the 1990’s according to a study by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It is well documented that poor socio-economic status and poor oral health are linked, and the statistics do speak for themselves. However it is not just the financially disadvantaged who are presenting with increased prevalence of dental problems, it is happening across all levels of income and background.

Why is this? We all know that sugar consumption is linked to dental decay. But what isn’t so obvious is how much our sugar consumption has increased in the last 50 years; over this period sugar consumption has tripled worldwide, mainly as a result of it being added to soft drink and cheap processed foods. However, the issue is not merely about “hidden” sugar but people living in a way that means they are eating carbohydrate rich meals, sugar laden snacks, biscuits, sweets and chocolates, drinking soft drink full of sugar and caffeine or having excess fruit and fruit juices and smoothies which are nothing more than concentrated sugar under the guise of a healthy choice. Our waistlines are expanding while at the same time, the incidence of heart disease, diabetes and dental decay continues to soar.

While excess sugar is thought to be a key cause of the obesity epidemic, obesity itself is not the root cause of disease, but it’s presence is a marker for metabolic damage and changes that lead to heart disease and diabetes. Metabolic damage, oxidative stress and systemic chronic illness also impact on oral health. Sugar is so harmful to health that there are calls for it to be controlled and taxed in the same way as tobacco and alcohol. Research indicates that sugar indirectly contributes to 35 million deaths a year worldwide as there appears to be links to the massive rise in diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes since we began eating more sugar. The health effects of excess sugar consumption are similar to those of alcohol.

For the first time in human history, non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes, pose a greater health burden worldwide than infectious disease. While alcohol, tobacco and diet are all targeted as risk factors for these diseases by policymakers, Doctors are apparently calling for attention to be turned towards the dangers of excess sugar consumption. Sugar provides “empty calories”, and a growing body of evidence suggests that fructose (one component of table sugar) can trigger processes that lead to liver toxicity and a host of other chronic diseases.

While sugar was only available as fruit and honey at certain times of the year to our ancestors, it is now present in nearly all processed foods. In some parts of the world people are consuming more than 500 calories worth of sugar per day. There is growing evidence that excess sugar has an effect on human health beyond simply adding calories and can cause many of the same problems as alcohol, including high blood pressure, high blood fats, insulin resistance and diabetes. The economic and human costs of these diseases place excess consumption of sugar in the same category as smoking and drinking, and like tobacco and alcohol, sugar acts on the brain to encourage dependence. Specifically, it interferes with the workings of a hormone called ghrelin (which signals hunger to the brain) and it also affects the action of other important compounds.

Oral health is determined by various factors including diet, stress and the use of alcohol or tobacco. In ‘The World Oral Health Report’ published by WHO, it is stated “The rapidly changing (oral) disease patterns throughout the world are closely linked to changing lifestyles which include diets rich in sugars, widespread use of tobacco and increased consumption of alcohol”.

If we are to tackle not only the decline in oral health but the overall health of the population then it makes sense that we address our level of sugar consumption, but at the same time we must surely stop and observe the way in which we are living. Something has gone drastically wrong when despite our remarkable medical advances and vast knowledge of the body, nutrition and illness and disease the statistics show that we are fighting a losing battle as the prevalence of heart disease, diabetes and cancer continue to rise.

Is it possible that it is too confronting to stop and ask ourselves why are we eating so much sugar? Would it reveal things about us and the way we are that could be challenging and mean that we have to take responsibility for our daily choices? Like the fact that we eat sugar because we are exhausted, stressed or seeking comfort. Or we are seeking a moment of pleasure, a quick buzz, and a high via a sugar rush that gets our nervous system revved up and out of balance. Or we are desperate to numb the way we feel inside and avoid dealing with life. Or we do not feel alive enough just as we are without altering our brain and body chemistry with foods.

What if there was a way to live that meant we could live from what is naturally inside by simply connecting to the “real you”, a real you that once experienced you would never want to dull, compromise or alter in any way? The workshops, talks and books of Serge Benhayon of Universal Medicine and the esoteric wisdom present that we are all equally love and by connecting to and living that love the natural inner balance and harmony of the body and the real you can be restored. Is it possible then if we were to live life in this way that our need to consume vast amounts of sugar would simply drop away, and our health and oral health would improve as a consequence?

To this I would simply have to answer, yes of course, for I have witnessed it first hand for my part in not only the way I live but also in those associated with Universal Medicine and practitioners of esoteric modalities and in my own dental patients that have then gone on to implement more self-caring lifestyle choices and practices into their everyday living.

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